Portland, Oregon's Doggie Dash hosted by the Oregon Humane Society

Imagine a day when the streets are closed to cars, and open to … dogs!

That’s exactly what happens on May 9, when an estimated 3,000 dogs will walk, trot, amble and run in the 28th annual Oregon Humane Society Doggie Dash. The event is largest gathering of canines on the West Coast and the biggest fundraiser of the year for OHS.

Naito Parkway will be closed to cars so people and their furry friends can enjoy a 2.5 mile run/walk over the Hawthorne and Steel bridges, or take a relaxing stroll around Waterfront Park. The park itself will be turned into a blocks-long pet-festival. Everyone is welcome to register for the Dash (with or without a dog) and to enjoy a pancake breakfast, live music, vendor booths and more.

“One of the best things about Doggie Dash is dog-watching,” said OHS Executive Director Sharon Harmon. You’ll never see so many dogs having a great time together.” Funds from Doggie Dash — which has a goal of raising $550,000 — will help OHS find homes for 11,000 pets this year. All proceeds from the event benefit OHS, which never puts a time limit on how long pets stay available for adoption.

Registration for Doggie Dash is $30 before the event and $35 the day of the event. To register in advance, visit the OHS Website at oregonhumane.org/doggiedash or call (503) 285-7722 ext. 412. The online discounted registration ends at midnight May 7.

When: Saturday May 9, 2015

Time: On-site registration opens at 7:30 am; all runners, plus the first wave of walkers, start at 9:00 am; final group of walkers leaves at 9:45 am.

Place: Tom McCall Waterfront Park in downtown Portland (SW Naito Parkway and SW Stark)

Cost: $30 online by May 7; $35 the day of the event. Children 10 and under free with  articipating adult.

Contact: oregonhumane.org/doggiedash or call (503) 285-7722 ext. 412

Road Closure: Naito Parkway will be closed to vehicular traffic from 8:30 am to 11:00 am between NW Everett St. and SW Jefferson St.

To read more about pooch-friendly Portland, including where to sit, stay and play, check out the Spring 2015 issue of CityDog Magazine!

Photo: Doggie Dashers along the Eastbank Esplanade, courtesy of Oregon Humane Society.

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Watch how it works here!

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Marijuana is a frequently debated subject, with recent votes legalizing recreational marijuana in Alaska and Oregon, and discussions about the growing popularity of cannabis-infused pet products like Canna-Pet and Canna Companion. For almost every human marketplace there is a pet equivalence—including the marijuana market.

As it becomes more of a household topic, many pet owners may be asking, what does this mean for my pet?

With today being April 20 (aka “420”), Trupanion, a company that offers medical insurance for cats and dogs, looked into its database to find how marijuana—intended either for people or for pets—is impacting cats and dogs. In this case, Trupanion found the below:

Cats aren’t particularly interested in marijuana.

Dogs, on the other hand, have rolled in it, ingested it, and are much more likely to grab some special brownies off the counter top.

There are several cases of marijuana toxicity across the country and, not shockingly, the most marijuana claims per capita are in Washington and Colorado (the first states to legalize recreational marijuana), with three times more marijuana toxicity claims compared to the average in other U.S. states.

Trupanion has paid over $78,000 in suspected marijuana toxicity claims.

In 2014 alone, Trupanion paid over $20,000 specifically toward confirmed marijuana toxicity cases.

The average marijuana toxicity claim costs about $525 on average to treat.

Marijuana Pet Myths Busted

Trupanion’s on-staff veterinarian, Dr. Denise Petryk, debunks some common myths about marijuana and pets to shed some light on the subject below:

Do dogs get high? Can my dog get a secondhand high?
Dogs can show symptoms of marijuana toxicity within a few minutes of inhaling smoke or a couple hours after ingesting marijuana. They may experience impaired coordination, excessive urination and even loss of control of urination (incontinence), drooling, vomiting, lethargy, depression, dilated pupils, and light and sound sensitivity and in severe cases they may go into seizures or even a coma.

While some people may enjoy the effects of THC, the psychogenic component of marijuana, pets don’t understand it and its effects can be a confusing and stressful experience.

If pets can be prescribed medical marijuana, can I just give them some of my own stash?
Veterinarians do not recommend that you deliberately give your pet marijuana because the effects of THC on your pet can be harmful or unpredictable. Each strain of marijuana includes different compounds with varied psychogenic and medicinal effects.

Medical marijuana intended for pets can be different than the marijuana intended for people and you should keep your stash away from your pet.

While some anecdotal cases have shown very positive effects of pet-intended medical marijuana in dogs and cats, the reality is, very few studies have proven a beneficial effect for pets and the risks have not been completely investigated. If you are interested in treating your pet with cannabis products, do so under the supervision of a trusted veterinarian in a controlled environment.

Trupanion, a company that offers medical insurance for cats and dogs, will cover medicinal marijuana when specifically recommended by a veterinarian. The company has seen claims for medicinal marijuana primarily alongside cancer treatments.

Can my dog die from eating too much marijuana?
If your pet ingests marijuana, you should take them to the veterinarian for monitoring. While pets typically recover from marijuana intoxication with no long-term effects, complications and an especially potent strain or a large amount of THC can be fatal.

If I know my dog ingested marijuana, should I tell my veterinarian? Will I get in trouble?
Don’t hesitate to tell your veterinarian if your pet has had access to marijuana—the signs of marijuana intoxication among pets can be indications of far more serious conditions (see the effects of marijuana on dogs in the above graphic), so being open can help your veterinarian eliminate more serious conditions and prevent testing needed to rule out other causes.

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We definitely dig what this Utah-based shelter is doing…putting adoptable dogs in a photo booth and the result is…well, magic! Guinnevere Shuster, social media and photography coordinator at The Humane Society of Utah came up with the idea and happily, each dog you see below has been adopted!

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While there are no reported cases of canine influenza in the Seattle area, it continues to spread across the greater Chicago area. According to Cook County Department of Animal and Rabies Control in Illinois, more than 1,000 dogs have become sick and five have died as a result of canine influenza.

“The recent marked increase in canine respiratory disease in Chicago and the surrounding area is very concerning,” said Dr. Mark Ernst, the state veterinarian for Illinois with the Bureau of Animal Health and Welfare.

At BluePearl Veterinary Partners three specialty and emergency hospitals in the greater Chicago area, 40 cases have been seen in the last week.

The disease starts out similar to kennel cough and spreads through interaction with other dogs. However, unlike kennel cough, the symptoms associated with canine influenza or canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD) are much more severe.

The symptoms of CIRD include coughing, fever, lethargy and a general lack of appetite.

If you notice your dog exhibiting any of these symptoms, take him or her to your veterinarian as soon as possible.

Luckily, there are ways to prevent your pup from being affected by the outbreak. Even if you don’t think your dog is at risk, please take these precautions until the outbreak of canine influenza comes to an end.

Most importantly, BluePearl Veterinary Partners recommends speaking with your veterinarian to make sure your pet is vaccinated against CIRD to prevent its spread in our region.

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Can I Interest you in a Pup Pop?

Pup Pops™ are refreshing, all-natural, low fat, frozen treats for dogs. They are small and tasty water-based freezer pops that provide an alternative way to rehydrate your dog. Pup Pops are infused with dog-friendly herbs to support health and enhance flavor.

I am looking for support through the dog community to raise funds to start manufacturing “Bowl Lickin’ Chicken and Ginger” as well as “Belly Rubbin’ Berry and Chamomile.”

Click here to support the Pup Pops Kickstarter campaign and get free samples.

Visit the Pup Pops website at coolpuppops.com.

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This issue’s cover, shot by Seattle photographer Don Norris, is particularly special, because it features our Cover Dog Model Search winner, Liberty. This beautiful girl, a 10-year-old Great Pyrenees to be exact, was found running along a Texas highway, dragging a six-foot chain behind her. Not only that, her collar was embedded in her neck and she was covered in fleas, ticks and burrs. She was also heartworm positive. (Pictured to the left: Liberty on the day of her rescue.)

Her rescuers, Sue (mom) and Karen (daughter) took excellent care of Liberty (pictured to the right is Liberty at the groomer immediately after her rescue)—however, when Sue’s husband passed away, she was unable to continue to care for the now 100-pound dog (Liberty weighed 67 pounds when she was found). Sue and Karen contacted Saving Pyrs in Need in Dallas (SPIN), who then contacted Liberty’s new owner, asking if she could take the senior dog. Needless to say, Liberty didn’t have a great start in life, but she is a true testament to survival and thanks to the collective efforts of her rescuers and SPIN, today she lives happily in Kirkland, Wash. with her forever family, mom Jeannine and fellow rescue dogs Blaze, Jazzy and Harper.

We are honored to have Liberty, the winner of our Cover Dog Model Search, gracing the cover of this issue and speaking of the model search, this year marks its 10th anniversary. Over the years, thousands of dogs have walked the catwalk, raising thousands of dollars for animal welfare organizations. This year, we are kicking things off with a model search at Furry 5K on June 11 to benefit the Seattle Animal Shelter and the Seattle Pet Expo on June 20 for Old Dog Haven. For more information about these model searches click here.

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Central Bark is a wholly interactive doggy daycare on the edge of downtown Seattle, but the fun doesn’t stop there. In addition to daycare we provide overnight boarding, grooming, training and the Laundr-A-Mutts self-service dog wash! Visitors to our playroom get to spend a play filled day with our wranglers and even take a trip to our private off-leash park. With webcams in our playrooms it’s easy to check in on your four-legged kid while you’re at work or on vacation. And the best part? Taking home a tired happy dog at the end of the day!

For more information, visit www.central-bark.com. Woof!

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Is your fur friend looking for a new collar to keep them stylish and safe? Look past the box retailers and look at handmade in Montana USA collars by Montana Grrl Critter Gear. Her collars are all cotton and contain no nylon webbing, yet still maintain their sturdiness and style. Each is made with cotton fabric, interfacing and love, with lots of attention to detail.

Since the collars are webbing-free, they are lighter and machine washable. Many owners have stated that their pets prefer them to the regular nylon collars. Many pets have nylon allergies, causing them to scratch at their collars. Nylon is also hard to clean, causing yeast to build up on collar which causes scratching.

Collars are available for cats and dogs in a variety of patterns. Use coupon code  CITYDOG15 and save 20% when ordering at montanagrrl.com.


Sponsored by Montana Grrl Critter Gear

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